Modeling a Wave on a String With the Finite Difference Method in Python

Photo: Rhett Allain. A plucked guitar string is a perfect example of a wave on a string.

There’s a very good chance that you have at least plucked a guitar string. When you do that, you deform the string under tension with some initial state. After that, the “plucked” parts of the string interact with the other parts of the string — and you get a wave.

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Physics faculty, science blogger of all things geek. Technical Consultant for CBS MacGyver and MythBusters. WIRED blogger.

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Rhett Allain

Rhett Allain

Physics faculty, science blogger of all things geek. Technical Consultant for CBS MacGyver and MythBusters. WIRED blogger.

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